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  • cách chơi bài baccarat de thang Chơi miễn phí

    June 25, 2020

    Feed grains, such as corn, barley, oats, and wheat, are important for Canadian beef production. Cereals are used as forage, including silage, swath grazing, or baled green feed, however cereal grains are a particularly attractive energy and protein source for the feedlot sector because of their high nutritional value, competitive pricing, and ready supply. Corn is the most energy dense cereal grain, followed by wheat, then barley and finally oats. However, the energy (i.e. starch) in corn isn’t as digestible in the rumen or small intestine, whereas energy from wheat, barley and oat kernels are rapidly broken down to be used by the animal. In terms of crude protein, wheat typically has the most protein followed by barley and oat, and then corn. Again, protein from wheat, barley or oats is more readily available for protein synthesis by rumen bacteria. Corn has a higher proportion of rumen undegradable protein, which means the protein “bypasses” the rumen and is only ....

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  • Meet the Council: Willingness to Adapt is Key for Managing Canadian Beef Operations

    June 22, 2020

    Feed grains, such as corn, barley, oats, and wheat, are important for Canadian beef production. Cereals are used as forage, including silage, swath grazing, or baled green feed, however cereal grains are a particularly attractive energy and protein source for the feedlot sector because of their high nutritional value, competitive pricing, and ready supply. Corn is the most energy dense cereal grain, followed by wheat, then barley and finally oats. However, the energy (i.e. starch) in corn isn’t as digestible in the rumen or small intestine, whereas energy from wheat, barley and oat kernels are rapidly broken down to be used by the animal. In terms of crude protein, wheat typically has the most protein followed by barley and oat, and then corn. Again, protein from wheat, barley or oats is more readily available for protein synthesis by rumen bacteria. Corn has a higher proportion of rumen undegradable protein, which means the protein “bypasses” the rumen and is only ....

    Continue Reading »

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The Beef Cattle Research Council (BCRC) is Canada's industry-led funding agency for beef, cattle and forage research. The BCRC is funded through a portion of the Canadian Beef Cattle Check-Off as well as government and industry funding, and is directed by a committee of beef producers from across the country.

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